Cycle trail from Sudbury to the Soo to open next summer

380 km trail will be the first full signed and maintained cycle trail in Northern Ontario

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Waterfront Regeneration Trust has been hosting pilot rides of the province’s first northern bike trail throughout the month of June, which is bike month across Ontario. The Lake Huron North Channel Trail is slated to open next summer. Supplied photo.

Cycling enthusiasts will have a brand new way to see Northern Ontario as early as Canada Day 2017.

Waterfront Regeneration Trust has been hosting pilot rides of the province’s first northern bike trail throughout the month of June, which is bike month across Ontario.

The Lake Huron North Channel Trail will be the first fully signed and maintained northern cycling trail of its size, stretching 380 km from Sault Ste. Marie to Sudbury, with 18 stops along the way.

 

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Support Northern Trails – Get the VTA Trail Guide

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Hikers on the VTA

VTA Trail Guide (2014)

The 2014 editon of the guidebook is now available.

with 42 Full-Colour 1:50,000 Maps and written trail descriptions for over 600 km of trails from Nipigon to Spanish (not continuous), contained in 6-ring binder. Includes an overview map of the entire trail system, table of contents, a map legend, details on how to make the most of your Voyageur Trail experience, and index tabs. The guidebook measures approx. 7.5″x5″; maps are bi-folded and are 11″ long when unfolded. The guidebook is designed so that individual map pages can be removed from the binder and carried in a Ziploc-type bag on an outing. Datum: NAD 83.

Members of the VTA may choose to pick the book up themselves to save shipping costs.

You can also buy the Trail Guide at a number of stores (list), both along the trail and in some other places throughout Ontario.

Updates to trails after the Trail Guide is printed are available at www.voyageurtrail.ca/trailupdates.html

Our condolences to family, friends and wilderness canoeists – George Luste

Loss of a Legend: George Luste, 1940-2015

Remembering an inveterate wilderness traveler

April 02, 2015By

George-luste

On a snowy February day in Toronto, I’m feeling inadequate standing at the podium in a high-school auditorium—not because of the 500 people in the audience, but for one larger than life man in the front row. Retired physicist George Luste founded theWilderness Canoe Symposium 30 years ago as a way for paddlers to share stories of their northern expeditions and to inspire new trips. The event has the feel of a latter-day Beaver Club—the exclusive gang of fur-traders who explored and mapped Canada in the 18th and 19th century and gathered to chat about it in wintery Montreal.

Following in the paddle strokes of explorers David Thompson, Alexander Mackenzie and Samuel Hearne, Luste spent 55 summers traveling Canada’s far north. He immigrated to Canada from Latvia in 1948 and made his first canoe trip in 1963, a solo journey on Ontario’s Abitibi River. He completed a Ph. D. at Johns Hopkins University before returning to Canada in 1971 for a professorship at the University of Toronto.

Canoeing was Luste’s passion. He paddled Canada’s iconic wilderness rivers—the Missinaibi, Rupert, Eastmain, Kazan, Nahanni, Coppermine, Stikine, and George—often in the company of his wife, Linda, and their children. What’s more, he was part of a group that made the first complete descent of the Dubawnt River in the Canadian barrenlands, pioneered many other multi-watershed routes, and was amongst the last to paddle Labrador’s Grand River before a massive hydroelectric project was completed at Churchill Falls.

Full Article – https://mail.google.com/mail/ca/u/0/#search/googlealerts-noreply%40google.com/14c829842c123947