Trailhead North – Path of the Paddle Association – we welcome you to the water trail experience!

New General Manager to coordinate development of all-water route between Thunder Bay and Manitoba

December 8, 2014

The Kenora Daily Miner and News recently published a story on Carrie Nolan’s hire as General Manager.  From the article: “Thunder Bay resident and accomplished canoeist Carrie Nolan brings a wealth of on-the-water experience to her new position as general manager of the Path of the Paddle Association. Association chairman Ed Shields referred to Nolan’s 15 years of experience in administration and paddling in a Dec. 1 press release announcing her hiring. “Carrie’s experience includes managing her own canoe tripping company, paddling 9000 km across Canada, guiding for Black Feather Wilderness Adventures on such rivers as the Nahanni as well as teaching and program directing in higher education for many years,” Shields stated. “Her education and experience, combined with a passion for paddling and appreciation of Northwestern Ontario will serve her well in this new role. Carrie believes that ‘Canada is what it is because of its’ waterways’ and is thrilled to be working on the development, sustainability and stewardship of this incredible water trail with the Path of the Paddle Association.” To see more, please click on this link:

http://www.kenoradailyminerandnews.com/2014/12/08/new-general-manager-to-coordinate-development-of-all-water-route-between-thunder-bay-and-manitoba

Northern Ontario Trails News – respect the law, snowmobile trail users.

Find your favorite ice-climbing trail!

Respect the law, cops tell snowmobilers

Tuesday, January 27, 2015   by: BayToday.ca Staff

City policehave issued a news release asking snowmobilers to respect the laws of the municipality.
Where snowmobiles are permitted
You may drive your registered snowmobile on your own property, on the private trails of organizations to which you belong, on private property when you have the owner’s permission or in permitted City zones. (see map).
Snowmobiles are only permitted on public highways when you are crossing it directly, provided that you come to a complete stop before crossing and that you yield the right of way to all vehicles on the highway before doing so.
Where snowmobiles are not permitted
In accordance with the City of North Bay’s municipal by-law, snowmobilers are not permitted to drive:
• on sidewalks, pathways, footpaths, or other pedestrian ways within the city limits;
• in any parks, except those areas illustrated;
• in any school yard or playground within the city;
• on any lake within 500 feet of the closest building on the land,unless you are driving to a direct point on the land to a permitted area, or vise versa.
Permits required to drive a snowmobile in Ontario
You can drive a snowmobile if you have a valid Ontario driver’s licence (any class).
If you do not have a driver’s licence and you are 12 years of age or older, a valid motorized snow-vehicle operator’s licence (MSVOL) will allow you to drive on trails established and maintained by a recreational organization for the use of snowmobiles.
However, you must be 16 years of age or older and have a driver’s licence or a motorized snow-vehicle operator’s licence to drive a snowmobile along or across a public road where snowmobiles are allowed.
Permits required to drive a snowmobile on approved trails
An OFSC (Ontario Federation of Snowmobile Clubs) snowmobile trail permit is required to be displayed on the windshield of your snowmobile in order to ride on the trails. For information on pricing and availability of the permits, visit the Ontario Federation of Snowmobile Clubs athttp://www.ofsc.on.ca or the Near North Trail Association athttp://www.nnta.ca.

Hiking The Giant, Ontario’s Largest Network of Hiking Trails

Sea Lion - Famous View at Sleeping Giant Provincial ParkSea Lion – Famous View at Sleeping Giant Provincial ParkPhotos by Richard Boon

Local hiking enthusiast, Richard Boon, provides a guide to hiking the Sleeping Giant, noting Ontario’s largest network of hiking trails is located in Sleeping Giant Provincial Park a short drive outside of Thunder Bay.

Sleeping Giant Provincial Park

Sleeping Giant Provincial Park, near Thunder Bay, is the place to go in Northwest Ontario for anyone who takes their hiking seriously.

The park, located on the Sibley Peninsula about an hour outside Thunder Bay, features more than 100 kilometres (62 miles) of trails, giving it the longest trail system of any Provincial Park in Ontario.

Whether you’re a beginner looking to gain a little experience, or you’re a seasoned hiker in search of new adventures, there is a trail that will suit your skill level and reward you with thrilling scenery, glimpses of wildlife, or hidden treasures such as secluded sandy beaches.

From and MORE at http://www.northernontario.travel/thunder-bay/hiking-the-giant-ontarios-largest-network-of-hiking-trails

Ontario becoming Best trail destination – worldwide, includes northern trails

Ontario Becoming Best Trail Destination Worldwide

La Cloche Silhouette Trail in Ontario Canada

If you are planning your summer hiking excursion, you may want to add Ontario to your short list. Over the past couple years,  Ontario has become one of the leading trail destinations worldwide. If you search trail information on Twitter, chances are, you’ll run across a number of trail-related Twitterites in Ontario. In general, Ontario provides a robust outdoor recreation scene with trails as one of their main focuses. Although hiking and backpacking trails make up the lion’s share of their trail system, bike trails are also beginning to pop up throughout the province. Whereas certain cities such as Amsterdam, Portland, Denver and Minneapolis are well known for biking and other areas such as Colorado, California and British Columbia are noted for hiking, Ontario is quickly and quietly becoming Trail Central by providing great trail opportunities including biking trails,hiking trails and backpacking trails. What sets Ontario apart among the various worldwide trail opportunities is their trail infrastructure and trail support system such as that provided by organizations such as Ontario Trails Council.
As written by trailsnet.com